Skip to main content

Full text of "Bag punching"

See other formats


OCTOBEK, 1895. 



$1.20 per Year 
Price, 10 Cents 



GV 1139 
.F83 



(yiam 



Copy 1 Y^LS 

f^yiTHLETIC 



LIBRARY 



m PUNCHING 




PUBLISHED BY THE 

fV1ERIQ\N 5P9M5 PUBLISHING C9 

2^1 BR°ADWAy, MEW YQRK 

Entered <at the New York Post Office, JV. I'., as Second Class Matter. 



...SPALDING'S... 
Illustrated Catalogue 



OF. 




..Base Ball 



BICYCL-E 5UNDR1E5, 

Lawn Tennis, Golf, Athletic Goods, 

UNIFORMS AND ACCESSORIES FCR ALL 

Spring and Summer Sports. 

Handsomely and profusely illustrated, the recognized 
authority for standard goods, "and the most complete cata- 
logue of its kind published. Mailed free to any address. 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 

126-130 Nassau St., New York. 
147 and 149 Wabash Avenue, 1216 Chestnut Street, 

Chicago. Philadelphia. 



J5ag flbuncbing* 

■ 

JCJLE5 FRANKS, 



Champion Bag Puncher of America. 




FULLY ILLUSTRATED WITH ENGRAVINGS SHOW- 
ING CORRECT ATTITUDES. 






PUBLISHED BY THE 

AMERICAN SPORTS PUBLISHING COMPANY, 

24T BROADWAY, NEW YORK, 



- 



ENTTRED ACCORDING TO ACT OF CONRESS. IN THE YEAR I895. by 

The American Sports Publishing Co., 

IN THE >FFICE CF THE LIBRARIAN OF CONGRESS, AT WASHINGTON 




No. X. 




No. 2. 



Bag punching 



Every sport has its utility. Swimming, Rowing, Track 
Athletics, Foot Hall and Boxing have their unquestioned advan- 
tages, and each contribute in different forms a benefit to ihe 
human physique. But while these sports develop the muscle 
and invigorate those that indulge in them, the accidents and 
mishaps attendant on them partly counterbalance the good to 
be derived. The footballist is more often laid up with shattered 
limbs than playing on the foot ball field ; the track athlete is a 
study in bandages and plasters all the year round and his rup- 
tures and strains an unending theme; the swimmer and oars- 
man, although never in position to suffer any violent wrench, 
are momentarily apt to furnish a sensational fatality story, and 
finallv the devotee of the manly art is universally decorated 




No. 3. 



RAG PUNCHING. 7 

with the escutcheon of his calling — a battered physiognomy. 

But the exercise in which are constituted all the promulgated 
benefits of field sports, aquatics and boxing, without incurring 
any of their dangerous features, is the simple calisthenic of 
" Punching the Bag." This pastime consists in hitting an in- 
flated leather bag about the size of an Association football wkh 
the naked fists or with gloves manufactured for the purpose. 
To such a pitch of popularity has the game now leached that it 
has become a recognized fad among professional boxers, and 
the indulgence in the exercise, too, among people in general 
who want an appliance for home training is gaining general 
favor and making rapid advances-'. 

And here a word of advice might be offered to those who are 
desirous of procuring the necessary apparatus for fixing a bag 
in their own homes. As might naturally be expected at first 
sight, the cost of a bag and ceiling would appear to be very 
great, but for a few dollars anyone can comfortablv provide 
himself with a bag ami striking gloves should he need them. 
A punching bag that seems to meet all requirements is the 
A. G. Spalding No. rS. It is the one endorsed by Corbett and 
Fitzsimmons, and their testimony ought to be a sufficient guar- 
antee of its qualities. Its cost is §10.00, but a capital one can 
be had for just half the money. Another style is the double 




No. 4. 



BAG PUNCHING. g 

end and a good one can be had for $4.00. A very fine pair of 
striking-gloves can be purchased for $2.50. They are a great 
protective for the hands, and beginners should at all times use 
them. 

As an exercise, punching the bag is very fascinating. There 
is a wonderful temptation even in the very appearance of the 
ball as it hangs suspended in the air, because no matter how 
weak the physique or imagination the most puisne cannot fail 
for a moment to fancy himself facing an antagonist, and will 
immediately start to put his powers into execution and drive 
viciously at the leather sphere. 

To the professional and amateur athlete, especially the am- 
bitious boxer, this form of exercise is by no means easy of 
attainment, and it requires careful study and plenty of work to 
become proficient. All the noted boxers pride themselves on 
their skill as bag punchers. Corbett, Fitzsimmons, Choyinski, 
Ryan, Dixon, Plimmer, Smith ami Jlarrv assert superiority 
over each other and claim to lie the Originator of the different 
methods of hitting. 

Like most of its contemporaneous relatives, the early history 
of this pastime is shrouded in mystery and the real originator 
of the game will never be known. The English boxers of a 
few generations ago were familiar with a bag, an article about 




No. 5. 



BAG PUNCHING. II 

the size of a man. This affair was usually swung from the 
crossbeam of a barn or other roomy edifice. It generally 
weighed about sixty pounds — a horseskin wallet filled with 
bricks, old horseshoes and the like. 

The Americans used a modified form. During the fighting 
days of Arthur Chambers, Billy Edwards and Billy Madden, 
Arthur Chambers had one in his Philadelphia gymnasium, but, 
like its British predecessor, the workmanship was crude and the 
exercise attained did not cause any amount of comment or lead 
anyone to believe that it would one day become the peer of all 
indoor exercises. This was during the Centennial of 1876. 

In all public gymnasiums during that period the twelve, 
fifteen and thirty pound bags, made of canvas and stuffed with 
chamois, oakum and excelsior were sometimes used. They 
were generally suspended from beams about twelve or fourteen 
feet high and any one who could knock them over the beam 
earned the reputation of a hard puncher. Apropos of this a 
story' is told of John C. Heenan. The great fighter was travel- 
ing around England and was then but in poor condition from 
the effects of high living and other luxuries. He chanced to 
ramble into the old gymnasium at Oxford college, England, 
where an old-time bag was hanging. Some of the students 
recognizing the Benecia boy, asked him to give the bumper a 




Ho. 6. 



BAG PUNCHING. I3 

shot, and the once king of the prize ring quickly removed his 
silk coat and squared off before the bundle. After tapping it 
a few times to limber up he let fly at the bag. The whack it 
received resounded through the building and the bag sailed 
twice around the crossbeam before the sound of the punch 
died away. 

But this style of bag proved the most dangerous appliance in 
the gymnasium, for anyone who had not the proper idea of 
punching surely came to grief by spraining their wrist. 

However, as time wore on, the prize ring was undergoing a 
revolution, but no one seemed to pay attention to the punching 
bag until, in a moment of sublime reverie, Professor Mike Don- 
ovan, of the New York Athletic Club, thought a lively leather 
bag was the thing, and to the genius of the genial professor 
the followers of fistic science are indebted for the punching bag. 

In 1876 Donovan was training for his fight with McClelland 
for the middleweight championship of America at San Fran- 
cisco, and as a part of his exercise used the punching bag. 
There were no India rubber bladders in those days and Mike 
kept his trainers busy securing cow bladders from the slaughter 
houses in the vicinity of Frisco. 

Cook made bags of calf and sheepskin, round and pear 
shaped. - He used rubber bladders and his bags became popular. 




No. 7. 



BAG PUNCHING. 15 

John Rumsey, of Cleveland, Ohio, manufactured a double 
end bag. It was oblong in shape, made of fancy canvas and 
attached to the floor and ceiling. The attachment from floor 
to hag was of rubber and from bag to ceiling common rope, so 
that the bag could be lowered or raised to suit the trainee. Of 
course there have been a great many improvements in the com- 
position of the ball. The contrast and result of the heavy bag 
of the old days and the late improved style is great. The new 
one makes a man quick while the old one made a man slow. 
If you do not guard or duck with the one of to-day you are 
liable to get countered, for they are quicker than nine-tenths 
of the men of the present day. 

There is a secret in bag making like everything else, and out 
of the number who have tried but very few have been suc- 
cessful. Only selected skins can be used and only the choicest 
part. The leather is cut on forms, after being thoroughly 
stretched, and the grain of the leather should all run one way. 
This will ensure a uniform roundness and the stitches will 
draw out evenlv after the bladder is inflated. 




No. 8. 



BAG PUNCHING. 



A CORRECT riETHOD OF STRIKING AND THE 

DIFFERENT POSITIONS THOROUGHLY 

EXPLAINED. 



Regarding the best method of punching the bag, Mr. Jules 
Franks, the acknowledged champion bag puncher of America, 
kindly allowed himself to be photographed and the accompany- 
ing cuts are strongly recommended to all who care to be pro- 
ficient in the art. To boxers these attitudes should be of the 
most vital interest. 

Professor Donovan says : " The most important thing is the 
punching ball ; practising with it quickens the eyes, develops 
the hitting muscles and makes a man a two-handed hitter. 
Punch it as much as possible alternately with left and right; 
this style of hitting is good practice for two-handed in-fighting, 
and two hands are always better than one. 

" By frequently using the bare knuckles on the ball it will 
harden the hands and give you a greater variety of blows. I 




No.9. 



BAG PUNCHING. 19 

regard the punching ball as the most valuable mechanical 
assistance to a fighter in training." 

No. 1. 

The first position in punching the bag should be much the 
same as in sparring. The centre of the ball should be a little 
below the level of the eyes and the distance from the loop of 
the ball should not be more than three feet; any greater length 
makes too much swing. 

No. 2.— LEFT LEAD. 

Step forward with the left foot and instantly strike out 
straight from the shoulder with your left hand, aiming for the 
centre of the ball and throwing the weight of the body into the 
blow. In striking thus turn your head slightly to the right aid 
hold your right forearm across the breast a little below the 
nipples. Avoid a counter from the bag. Be careful and avoid 
all slapping and do not strike at the ball in a downward 
direction, as such motions only shorten your reach, gives an 
unpleasant twang to the elbow and lessens the force of your 
blow. Do not miscalculate the distance and overbalance your- 




No. 10. 



BAG PUNCHING. 21 

s«lf, and after delivering the blow spring quickly back into 
position, guarding yourself at the same instant and repeat 
the lead. 



No. 3.— RTGHT LEAD. 

Face the bag as you would an opponent, at about the distance 
you could land effectively. Strike out and step in slightly with 
your left foot and throw all your weight into the blow. Duck 
your head slightly to the left to avoid counter and immediately 
spring into position again. 



No. 4.— RIGHT HALF ARM SWING. 

Step to your left from the regular position with your left foot, 
bending both knees and twist your body, throwing all the 
weight you are capable of in the one direction, and make as 
near a one movement of it as possible. In executing the blow 
you follow on a direct line with your left foot and place the 
left hand in such a position as to guard the face, which should 
be bent toward the left shoulder. 




; No. 11. 



BAG PUNCHING. 23 

-No. 5.— LEFT SWING. 

Hold yourself well together, keeping your left arm well back, 
spring quickly forward on the left foot and swing your left with 
a half circular motion and a swing of the body, and pivot on 
the balls of both feet, and, at the same time duck your head 
well to the right. 

No. 6.— RIGHT SHIFT— LEFT SWING. 

This blow is delivered after stepping out of the regular 
position. With the right foot swing the arm and body in one 
move. 

No. 7. 

Duck or side step after swinging the left. After gaining 
position instead of repeating the blow, simply step forward 
slightly to the right with the left foot. Duck and throw your 
head out of harm's way. This is a good move to make one 
shifty and should be practised as much as possible. 

Nos. 8 AND 9. 

Continuous elbow and short arm swings. This is one of the 
best movements for developing the shoulders and back. Stand 




No. 12. 



hAt; PUNCHING. 2$ 

directly under the bag and hit it with the right elbow and righ k 
hand, then reverse and land with the left elbow and left hand. 
It is a good way to become proficient by commencing with the 
right and left and occasionally use the elbows. 

No. 10. 

Forward and backward and elbow movement ; that is, with 
one arm only. The backward stroke with the elbow and the 
forward one with the right hand. The position can be changed 
and the left hand used. 

No. ii.— ONE-TWO CONTINUOUS— LEFT AND RIGHT 
STRAIGHT. 

Stand directly in front of the bag and punch straight from 
the shoulder. Care should be taken to direct the blows for the 
centre of the ball or a counter is liable to occur. 

Nos. 12 AND 13. 

This movement is one of the best and can be used as a right 
or left single hander continuous blow. Stand directly in front 
of the ball and hit a hook blow. It will have a tendency to 




No. 13. 



RAG PUNCHING. 27 

send the bag over the opposite shoulder and the return will be 
in exact position to land with great force as you hit. Swing 
the shoulder, and, after practising, the learner will easily 
follow the bag's movements and in the end become very pro- 
ficient as a judge of time and distance. 



No. 14.— UPPER CUT. 

This is seldom or ever executed in bag punching, but it is a 
good blow to practise. In delivering the blow draw the right 
arm well back, and, as you do so, swing it in about a cpiarter 
circle and strike upward for the bag. 



No. 15. — RIGHT HAND HALF SWTN ',. 

This has long been regarded as one of the best moves in box- 
ing and when it lands generally proves effective. Place your- 
self immediately in front of the bag with the left guard protect- 
ing the face. Raise on the balls of both feet and swing the 
body and duck the head to the left shoulder, lowering it at the 
same instant, and shoot out the right and follow the direction 
of the body, putting all its weight into the blow. 




No. U. 




No. 15, 



Spalding's j 

DOUBLE END.... || 

Striking Bag 1 




.SPHERICAL SHAPE : M 



Each Bag complete in a box, 

with Bladder and necessary 

screws for suspending. 



No. 6. 



No. 5. 



Double End Bag, extra fine se- £;•:; 

lected leather cover, workman- :*.)4 

ship and finish of best quality. Rubber fi;f 

tube Tor floor and cord for ceiling at- *•;.•:! 

tachment ; complete, in b >x, $7.00 -t";-* 

Double End Bag, regulation ':':£'. 

size, specially tanned horse- ;";£! 

hide leather cover, well sewed and all v?:, 

substantially constructed. Rubber tube '£:•. 

for floor, and cord for ceiling attachment ; \:'.-, 

all complete, in box, . . . Each, $5.00 > : * : , 

Double End Bag, regulation size, good '£•; 

quality leather cover and well made ."•^ 

throughout. Rubber tube for floor and cord for •;"; 

ceiling attachment ; all complete in box, $4-00 $'& 

Extras. £j 

No. B. Bladders, extra quality, Each, $ { .00 $jf : 

No. D. Elastic Floor Attachment, " ,5Q 2?5i 



Our Complete Catalogue 



for all athletic sports and uniforms 

Free to any address. 



A. G. 



SPALDING 



& 

BROS., 



jg! NEW YORK. CHICAGO. 

* PHILADELPHIA. 




••••■;;• 



•:•'• •:•'• ••:•*• ••:••• .•:•'• .•:•'• •;.?..•;.•..•:• 



mx*****^***^****% 



* 
* 



SPALDING'S 

Rumsey Pattern 




DOUBLE END 



Striking Bag. * 

m 
m 

m 




Rumsey Pattern, 



. . . CYLINDRICAL SHAPE . . . 

Each Bag complete in box with 
Bladder and necessary screws for 
suspending. 

No I Outside cover of soft, strong ducking, 
with non-elastic Suspending Cord at top and 
elastic rubber floor attachment. An ideal bag 
for the home circle. It is soft and elastic, 
very lively and may be used with pleasure and 
profit to all. • • • Pnce, $5.00 

EXTRA BLADDERS. 

No. | R. For Rumsey Bag, . Each, $3.50 



Our Complete Catalogue for all Athletic Sports and 
Uniforms Mailed Free to any Address. 

G. SPALDING & BROS., 

CHICAGO. PHILADELPHIA 



* 
* 
* 

X 
* 

* 



% 
X 
X 



3kL NEW YUKiv. w...~™~. ^p, 



py.-: 

••.:■•'•• 

■'•:.'• 

•'.■."• 



••'?'■'•• 



;i* 





:*;•■r::;v/;.•:•:^;•^>^:.••:rv•^•r::.•••?::;^ ? -*^ : ?;:;^^^•:^:•;>:>j•:^;•;'^;.;••:^:^•••;*••.v^ 

SPALDING'S . . . 

^Striking Bags. 

HIGHEST QUALITY 
CORBETT BAG. No. 18. 

Designed and endorsed by 
James J. Corbett, cham- 
pion of the world. Made of the very finest 
grain leather, specially tanned for this bag, 
extra well and carefully made throughout, and 
each bag the exact duplicate of the one used by 
Champion Corbett in training and for exhibition 
purposes. Splendidly adapted for gymnasium 
work. Complete in box, $ | O.OO 

HIGHEST QUALITY 
GYMNASIUM BAG. 

No. 13 Made in regula- 
tion size and of the finest 
mported pebble grain leather ; the sewing and 
workmanship throughout are of the most sub- 
stantial character, and we have spared 
no expense in making this an ideal bag 
for gymnasium work. The bladder is 
of a special grade of red Para rubber, 
extra heavy and made expressly for 
this bag. It is extremely lively and 
very durable. We recommend nothing 
cheaper in striking bags intended for 
gymnasium use. Packed complete in 
box, . . $8.00 

No. |2. THE STANDARD SPE- 
CIAL. Regulation size, made of se- 
lected grain leather, fine quality rub- 
ber bladder and substantially made 
throughout. Packed complete in box. 
A splendid bag for home or individual 
use $5.00 

No. |p. JHE STANDARD. 

11 Regulation size, made of specially tan- 
ned horsehide leather, fine quality rubber bladder, well made in 
every respect. Complete in box, $4.00 

EXTRA BLADDERS. 

No. A. For Corbett Bag No. 18 and Gymnasium Bag No. 13. 
Extra fine quality rubber and expressly made for these bags, $ | .50 

No. B. For Standard Bags No. 12 and 10. Fine quality rubber 
and very durable, $ I .00 

Our Complete Catalogue for Athletic Sports and Uniforms 
Mailed Free to any Address. 




•:-.v 



NEW YORK. 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 

CHICAGO. PHILADELPHIA. 






M 



>:•••.••••■••:••« 

M8t£m 






•v.;.-* 



\;*- 



ti "' ■'■■■*» S! s; is la :: » 



S3 ,;;:u :i 13 ,; ss . 



.: :: 



a "• 

:: :r~ 

s:;. :: 

:: :: 

:: :: 

:: a 

a :: 

:: :: 

:: :: 

a s 

a :: 

5- "3 

E„..:4 
" " 

:: a 

:: :: 
:: a 

s.-M 
« a 
» « 

5 3 

:: a 




Striking 
* Bag 



Gloves. 



Made of tanned kid, back of hand 
and finger tips padded. Will protect 
the hands, and recommended for use 
with all striking bags. 



Per pair, $2.50 



* & * 



Striking Bag Swivels. 




No. 9. Ball and 
socket action. full nick- 
el-plated. The part 
containing socket(Fig. 
2), and from which 
rope is suspended, un- 
screws from base (see 
Fig. 1), which is per- 
manently fastened to 
ceiling or drum. This 
permits the bag to be quickly suspended for use 
without readjusting the height, and can be as readily 
removed when notin use; a very desirable attach- 
ment for those having private bags in gymnasiums. 

Complete, $ I .OO. 

No. | | „ Swivel action, japanned 
iron, fasten permanently to disc, and 
rope is attached to ring. 





Complete, 75c. 

Brass Inflaters. 



H 



No. 2. 

No. 3. Pocket Size, cylinder 5% inches, . . Each, 50<5. 

No. 2- Club Size, cylinder 10 inches, . . . " $ | .OO 

Our Complete Catalogue for all Athletic Sports and Uniforms 

Mailed Free to any Address. 



" a 

H I! 

s '.a 

a a 

a a 

a a 

a a 

a a 

a a 

a u 

n n 

s :: 



A. G. SPALDING A BROS., 



'%. 



i: 




SPALDING'S 



BOXING GLOVES 



HIGHEST.... 
QUALITY 




Representing the highest grade of material, workmanship and finish, ^jj|p 

and the most perfect in design our past experience £M£, 

enables us to produce. 

No. J 30. Spalding's Highest Quality 8-oz. " Instructor's" Safety- 
Glove, with Graham's Patent Finger Protector and Bennett's 
New Heel Pad, giving absolute protection to the sparrer under 
all conditions ; made of the finest California tanned kid, laced 
front and stuffed with best curled hair. A very large and soft 
glove Per set of four gloves, $7. 50 

No. 100. Spalding's Highest Quality 6-oz. "Sparring" Glove, 
with Graham's Patent Safety Grip and Finger Protector ; made 
of extra quality velvet tanned dogskin, stuffed with best curled 
hair and lace front. . . . Per set of four gloves, $7, 50 

No. | |5. Spalding's Highest Quality 5-oz. "Club" Glove, with 
Graham's Patent Safety Grip, extra quality velvet tanned dog- 
skin, stuffed with best curled hair, lace front and heavily padded 
wrists ; made in accordance with legal regulations governing 
public contests. . . . Per set of four gloves, $7.50 

Complete Catalogue for all Athletic Sports and Uniforms 
Mailed Free to any Address. 




A. G. SPALDING & BROS, 



Chicago 



Philadelphia. 



<*& 



• • •• • 
•«• • • • 

• •••• 



>.•••> 
•>••• 



.».• 

:'•• 



• . •:• • 

• • •• • 

• • •• • 

• • a • » 
••••• 



COMPLETE CATALOGUE 

FOR ALL ATHLETIC SPORTS 
AND UNIFORMS / 



MAILED 
FREE 
TO ANY 
ADDRESS. 




SPALDING'S 

Boxing 
Gloves. 



No. 15. Improved pattern, French kid, claret- 
colored tan, ventilated palms, elastic wrist band. 

Per set, $5,00 

No. 17. Club pattern, French kid, claret-colored 
tan, heavily padded wrist and heel, lace front ; a very 
soft and well padded glove. ... Per set, $5.00 

No. 19. Improved pattern, extra quality gold-tan- 
ned kid, ventilated palms, elastic wrist band, nicely 
padded and substantially made. . . Per set, $4.00 

No. 21. Improved pattern, extra soft tanned white 
kid, ventilated palms and elastic wrist bands, well 
padded Per set, $3.00 

No. 23. All white kid, ventilated palms, elastic 
wrist band ; a full padded glove. . Per set, $2.50 

BOYS' QL0YE5 

No. 30. Boys' size, improved pattern, extra quality 
gold tanned kid, ventilated palms, elastic wrist bands, 
well padded and substantially made. Per set, $3.00 

No. 25. Boys' size, all white kid, ventilated palms, 
elastic wrist bands, extra well padded. Per set, $2.00 



T* 



A.G.Spalding & Bros. 



NEW YORK. 



CHICACO. 



PHILA. 



Corbett's^- 

STRIKING BAG. 



Endorsement 
of our.... 




JAS. J. CORBETT, 

Heavyweight Champion of the World. 

New York, November 1, 1894. 
Messrs. A. G. Spalding & Bros., 

Gentlemen : I take great pleasure in recommending the 
Spalding Striking Bag No. 18. I use it in all my exhib- 
itions throughout the country, and think it superior to any 
that I have heretofore used. It is perfect in size, and its 
weight — 15 ounces — makes it a very lively bag. I heartily 
recommend it to anyone who requires this kind of exercise. 

Yours truly, 




C AT k I nPIIF ofa11 atnlet;c s P° r t s and pastimes CDCC 
\jf\ I ALUUUL sent on application to any address | |\LL 

a q. SPALDING br^s 

NEW YORK. CHICAGO. PHILADELPHIA. 



J FitZSimmOnS' Endorsement # 
ai»> m ^i of our.... av> 



w 

W 



and Striking bag | 

§ Boxing 
Gloves. 




ROBERT FITZSinriONS, 

Middleweight Champion of the World. 

New York, October 1, 



1894. a| 



Messrs. A. G. Spalding & Bros. 

Gentlemen : It is with the greatest of pleasure that I can ,3^ 

recommend to all who are interested in boxing or exercise of any ™* 

kind, your Swinging Striking Bags. They are perfect in everv gig 

way, particularly the one which you furnished to me, which, ^^, 

I understand, is your regular No. 11. For home or gymnasium I ™* 

think it is just the thing. I will use it in all my exhibitions. g||i 

Gentlemen: After having given your Spalding "Highest AiL 

Quality" Boxing Gloyes a thorough test, I can recommend them 'Sf? 

as being the best Boxing Gloves 1 have ever used. Your Exhib- §|§r 

ition Gloves, regular 8 ounce, I will use in all my exhibitions pkN' 

throughout the United States; and your Fighting Glove I will ^tjL 

endeavor to have used in ever}' contest that I take part in in V2k? 

future. Without hesitation, I can recommend the Spalding ^jL 

" Highest Quality" Boxing Gloves to either amateurs or pro- ^^ 

fessionals. 



Yours truly, 



&Zcstb/ c/i/yt4W^?£r 



■Yjs* 



r'ATAI flPIIF of a11 athletic s P° rts and pastimes Cppr 
Li A I ALUUUL sent on application to any address | |\L L 

a. o. SPALDING 6 R ts 

NEW YORK. CHICAGO, PHILADELPHIA. 



CHAMPION JAMES J. CORBETT 

USED THE 

"Corbett" 

(TRADE MARK) 

Boxipg ©loves 

Manufactured by A. J. REACH CO., 
Tulip and Palmer Streets, Philadelphia, Pa., 

i„hi.Fi»m»itH MITCHELL VnrSBISSt*- 




The REACH 



la on the Wrist 



An Exact Duplicate of the Gloves used by CORBETT 
will be sent upon Receipt of Price. 

Per Set, - - $7.50. 

If ycu cannot get them in your city, address 

A. J. REACH CO., 

Tulip and Palmer Sts. c Philadelphia, Pa. 



mi 

m 


mi 


mi 



m 

# 


m 



m* 


mi 

m 

m^ 

m 


#$ 


« 








« 





•50S0S0S0S0S0S0S0S0S0 

OUR COMB/NAT/ON §§ 

Watch Charm and •^•ig- 

Whistle. Made j^\ 

of white metal. ^J 

Sent by mail, ^J$ 

postpaid, with fj£i 

Catalogue of "Eftf 

5000 interesting $$£ 

tricks and novelties, up- .Effii 

on receipt of five 2-cent V^t 

stamps. Sfcifc 

PECK & SNYDER, 730/VassaMSfeet ' 




NEW YORK CITY. 




the§CHOLARS 

Companions 



Every schoolboy and girl wants one. It consists of 
pen and holder, slate and lead pencil and pocket rule, 
in nicely polished hardwood telescope case eight inches 
long. Sent by mail, postpaid, with catalogue of 5,000 
interesting Tricks and Novelties, upon receipt of five 
2-cent stamps. 

730 Nassau Street, 
NEW YORK CITY. 



PECK & SNYDER, 



k^^^^r^^^^^^^^^^*^*^*^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^* 



SKATE SHARPENER 

POSTPAID, 30 CENTS. 



LYNCH SKATE PLANE [§ 
PATENTED JULY 17^1894 




The only sharpener making a concave or square 
surface. Works like a plane. Weighs only four ounces. 
Easily operated and will last a lifetime. Write for 
catalogue of Skates and 5,000 interesting Tricks and 



mi 





m& 



m& 



mi 


mi 


mi 




mi 



Novelties. 



PECK & SNYDER, 



130 Nassau Street. 
NEW YORK CITY. 



WE ARE THE ONLY BUILDERS OF THE 



GENUINE 

Famous St. Lawrence River Skiff 

AVOID WORTHLESS IMITATIONS. 




Look for our trade = mark 
shield, which is placed on every 
boat of our manufacture. 



Our eight boats, St. Lawrence 
River Skiffs; rowboats ; sailing ca- 
noes; paddling canoe; yacht tender 
and small sail yacht, received 

HIGHEST POSSIBL E AWARDS 

At World's Columbian Exposition. 



•Ve build HIGH GRADE Pleasure Craft of all 
kinds, from Canoe to Steam Launch. 



Our single-hander Sail Boats, of modern built, fin- 
keel type, are immensely successful cruisers and racers. 



On receipt of application, we will mai2 to any address 
our HANDSOMELY ILLUSTRATED AND DE- 
SCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE. 

ST. LAWRENCE RIVER 
SKIFF, CANOE AND 
STEAM LAUNCH CO., 

CLAYTON, 
Jefferson County, 

N. Y. 

Will Remove to OCDENSBURC, N. Y., on or aboui 
October I, 1895. 




«*» 




ATjHbETie Sweaters 

Our " Highest Quality " 
Sweaters are made of the 
very fi n e a t Australian 
lambs' wool and are ex- 
ceedingly soft and pleas- 
ant to wear. They are 
full fashioned to body and 
arms and without Beams 
of any kind. We call spe- 
cial attention to the " In- 
tercollegiate "grade which 
we originally made by spe- 
cial order for the Yale foot 
ball eleven and are now ex- 
clusivety used by all In- 
tercollegiate players. They 
are considerably heavier 
than the heaviest sweater 
ever knitted and cannot 
be furnished by any other 
maker, as we have exclus- 
ive control of this special 
weight. The various 
grades in our "Highest 
Quality " t Sweaters are 
identical in quality and 
finish, the difference in 
price being due entirely 
to variations in weight. Colors, White, Navy Blue, Black and Maroon. 

rfo. A. ** Intercollegiate,** special weight $7.00 

No. B. Heavyweight 5.00 

No C. Standard weight 4.50 

No. D. Medium weight 3.50 

Our complete catalogue of Athletic Uniforms and all other requisites Jo* 
Indoor and Outdoor Sports, mailed free to any address. 




A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 
New York. Chicago. Philadelphia, 





SEND FOR OUR 
COMPLETE 

ILLUSTRATED 
CATALOGUE 



rianufacturers of the 

Famous 

Campbell 

Racket 



Publishers of the 
OFFICIAL 

LAWN TENNIS 
GUIDE 



Wright & Ditson's Championship Ball 



Adopted by the United States Lawn Tennis Association, Intercollegiate 
Lawn Tennis Association, Southern Lawn Tennis Association, Canadian 
Lawn Tennis Association, and other Associations of the United States and 
Canada. 

Retail* 344 Washington St. 
Wholesale, 95 Pearl St. 



BOSTON, MASS. 



mm 



OFFICIAL 

Intercollegiate 



Adopted for the Fourth Year bv GnnT R. ATT 
the Intercollegiate Association. l"vUl L)ALL. 

•LBERT (J MILBANK MAHtQtn WALTER H W109US, AS81»t«,t M. N » GE « LANGOON LEA. C.=! 

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY FOOT BALL ASSOCIATION. 



Princeton. N. J., May..l6th,^ 1S9 1. 

A.C.Spalding & Bros., 
Gentlemen. 

It gives me much pleasure to Inform you that the 
Intercollegiate Football Association at the annual Spring Meeting held 
in New York May 15th, 1895 adopted unanimously the Spalding No. J ball 
as the official ball for the ensuing year and the same must be used 
In all match games of this Association. 







THE SPALDING OFFICIAL INTERCOLLEGIATE FOOT BALL 
MUST BE USED IN ALL GAHES PLAYED. 



PRICE, wi th Inflat e*-, $5.00. 

Each B«ll Packed in Separate Boat arj_d Sealed 
MANUFACTURED BY 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS., H ^^i^^°' 



THE 



^P&iclipg League Ball. 

ADOPTED BY THE 

National League and American Association 

Of Professional Base Ball Clubs. 




No. I. The Spalding League Ball, as adopted by the National 

League and American Association for the seasons of 92, Q3, 
; 94, '95 and '96, and used by the National League for the past 
16 years. Each ball wrapped in tinfoil and put in a separate 
box, as represented in the illustration, and sealed in accordance 
with the regulations of the National League and American As- 
sociation. Warranted to last a full game without ripping or los- 
ing its elasticity or shape, 
Price, ■ « Each, fl,«Q 





YlTHLEtlC 

Athletic 
Almanac 



By JAMES E. SULLIVAN. 




^PUBLISHED BYTMEX 



PffiRFQW SR9RB Pl/BUSfif&O C9 

2M1 m9ADv/AvrJsm r VQRk 



SPALDING'S 
CHEST WEIGHTS 




Price, 



$10.00 



No. 6. 

This is practically the same 
as our No. 5 Chest Weight with- 
out the Centre Arm Adjust- 
ment, and is susceptible of all 
the movements to be had in 
any wall machine, excepting' 
our No. 5. It is handsomely 
finished in japan, has double 
set of guide rods, compound 
ropes, swivel pulley and anti- 
friction bearings, perfectly 
noisless in operation and re- 
quires no oil. Each machine 
is furnished with ash wall 
boards, all necessary screws 
for setting up, and nicely crated 
for shipment. 



i6-lb. Weights. 

Our Complete Illustrated Catalogue of Gymnasium, Athletic 
and Outing Coods MAILED FREE. 

A. <3. SP/U-DIttG & BR05., 

New York, Chicago, Philadelphia. 



. . SPALDING'S . . 

OFFICIAL /PORTIHQ RULEJ. 

Compiled by JAMES E. SULLIVAN. 




Containing the latest official rules for the government of all kinds of 
sport. The most complete and up-to-date book ever published. Con- 
taining rules governing Archery, Basket Ball, Bicycling, Bowls, Skittles, 
Bowling, Lawn Tennis, Canoeing, Cricket, Croquet, Court Tennis, 
Curling, Fencing, Foot Ball, Gymnastics, Golf, Hitch-and Kick, Hand 
Ball, A. A. U. General Rules, A. A. U. Athletic Rules, Badminton, Bet- 
ting, Boxing — Marquis of Queensbury, London Prize Ring Rules; 
Broadsword (Mounted) Rules, Gaelic and Association, Lacrosse, National 
Rifle Association, Pistol and Revolver Shooting, Inanimate Target 
Shooting, Live Bird Shooting, Hockey, Polo (Water), Polo Association 
Rules, Polo (Rink), Quoiting, Racing— Potato. Sack, Obstacle, Three- 
Legged ; Dog Racing, Pigeon Flying, Rowing, etc., etc. 

PRICE, POSTPAID, 50c. 



Spalding's Athletic Library. 

Fully Illustrated. Published Monthly. Each Number Com- 
plete. Devoted to all kinds of Sports. 

No. 1. Life and Battles of James J. Corbett. 

No. 2. Indian Clubs and Dumb Bells. By J. H. Dougherty. 

No. 3. Bowling. By A. E. Vogell. 

No. 4. Boxing. The most valuable manual of its kind ever published. 

No. 5. Gymnastics. By Robert Stoll, N. Y. A. C. 

No. 6. Lawn Tennis. By O. S. Campbell. 

No. 7. Base Ball. By Walter Camp. 

No. 8. Golf. By J. Stuart Balfour. 

No. 9. Athletes' Guide. Articles on Training, Sprinting, Throwing Weights. 
Walking, etc., and Rules for Government of Athletic Games. 

No. 12. Gaelic and Association Foot Ball. 

No. 13. Hand Ball. How to play it. Rules and definitions. 

No. 14. Curling, Hockey and Polo. 

No. 15. Indoor Base Ball Guide. 

No. 16. Skating. 

No. 17. Basket Ball. 

No. 18. Fencing. Complete Manual of Foil and Sabre. 

No. 20. Cricket Guide. By George Wright. 

No. 21. Rowing. By E. J. Giannini, Champion Amateur Oarsman. 

No. 23. Canoeing. By C. Bowyer Vaux. 

No. 25. Swimming. By Walter G. Douglas. 

No. 26. How to Play Foot Ball. By Walter Camp. 

No. 27. College Athletics. By M. C. Murphy. 

No. 28. Athletic Almanac. By James E. Sullivan. 

No. 29. Exercising with Pulley Weights. By H. S. Anderson. 

No. 30. How to Play Lacrosse. By W. H. Corbett. 

No. 31. Spalding's Official Base Ball Guide for 1895. 

No. 32. Practical Ball Playing. By Arthur A. Irwin. 

No. 33. Lawn Tennis Guide for 1895. 

No. 34. Official Rowing Guide for 1895. 

No. 35. Intercollegiate A. A. A. A. Guide. 

No. 36. Official Golf Guide for 1895. 

No. 37. All-around Athletics. 

No. 38. Official Croquet Guide for 1895. 

No. 39. Lawn Bowls. By Henry Chadwick. 

No. 40. Archery. By James S. Mitchel. 

No. 41. Official Foot Ball Guide for 1895. Edited by Walter Camp. Por- 
traits of all prominent players. Official Rules. 

EACH COPY, 10 CENTS. 

AMERICAN SPORTS PUBLISHING COMPANY, 
241 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. 



::SP/cIi>DING'S:: 

trai^d Catalog a- 







FOOT BALL, ICE SKATES, 



GOLF AND POLO. 



ATHLETIC AND GYflNASIUM OUTFITS. 



Sweaters, Hunting Clothing and Equipments, 

and all Accessories for Fall and 

Winter Wear. 

Handsomely illustrated, and the recognized authority for standard ani 
up-to-date goods. Mailed free to any address. 



A. G. SPALDING & BROS., 



126-130 Nassau St., 147-149 Wabash At 
NEW YORK. CHICAGO. 



1216 Chestnut St., 
PHILADELPHIA. 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 




■ 



006 010 627 7 # 




BICYCLE CATALOGUE: FREE:. 

AG \3PALDfNO 6-5P05- 

CHICAGO PHILADELPHIA- NEW yORK- 

\hjt\l\9 WABASH AVfe-L U16 CHE3TNUT ^T. 1Z6-130 NA53AU5T